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20121101
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Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
're seeing in boston tonight. obviously, in chicago, they are waiting with great anticipation to see the president. and in boston, there is also anticipation but it's more like resigned anticipation. people who thought they were coming to a party instead are kind of watching a durnlg on-- durge. >> look at the demographic ps of these two crowds. that's all you need to know. >> ifill: that's a good point, david. when you look at the obama crowd, it's incredibly diverse, very young, obviously, in a better mood. ( laughter ). but the difference between that and what we're seeing in boston is pretty striking. >> you know, the country is changing. i mean, the gay marriage thing is part of the change, but the demographicez of the country are changing. the thing that's more confusing is the economics are changing and in much more complicated ways. that we're not seeing it's working class people, the people who are unemployed aren't in either crowds. they can't afford to be in those crowds. that's complicated. but the demographics and attitudes towards gay marriage and other social issues, t
to my former agency i think they absolutely would use them. >> rose: you just went to boston-- or to massachusetts to endorse elizabeth warren. >> yes. >> rose: who at one time thought might head up the consumer protection agency. that was not to be. >> right. >> rose: she wasn't even nominated by the president. >> right, right. >> rose: why did you endorse her? not that you shouldn't have, but why did you? >> she's my friend and i worked with her a lot. well, she was actually an advisory committee i set up at the f.d.i.c., to advicous consumer issues and how to make the banking system more accessible to lower income people. she was a tremendous help in that. and i worked with her when she became the chairman of the congressional oversight panel, nancy pelosi appointment, and we agreed a lot on some of the misuse of tarp funds. and when she became the special adviser to the consumer bureau, i was very supportive of the consumer bureau and tried to make sure the resources of the f.d.i.c. were there early on. we had several years of working together. we don't-- probably on fisc
states over the last 20 years. these figures correspond to cities like new york, atlanta, dallas, boston, los angeles, and they indicate how in the early 1990's, late 1980's, there was a very significant increase in the homicide rates. we have homicide rates all the way up to 60, 40, something like that. mexico's current homicide rate you can see on this tight. >> rose: 100,000. >> the rate is at 24 and it has raised significantly over the last few years. what we have confronted is a increase in homicide rates not only in mexico but in all the hemisphere over the last few years. in the decade between 2000 and 2010 the homicide rate, the average homicide rate in all of the americas increased by 60%. so what we're doing in mexico is a fight for security. we are improving the rule of law. we are confronting these cartels, we're trying to bring them down, bring them to justice. we are transforming institutions devoted to the rule of law. and we are also going to the most vulnerable area of society to try to reconstruct the social fabric. of course we want to have much better results. >> ros
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)